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ACE Clinical Update Service (CUES)

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ACE CUES is Singapore’s first nationwide educational visiting service for healthcare professionals, and is currently available to private general practitioners (GPs) on a free-subscription basis.

Clinical updates based on best available evidence are delivered through individualised discussions held at the GP’s preferred timing, with different topics offered over time. With CME accreditation, ACE CUES provides a convenient and efficient way for GPs to stay up-to-date with the latest developments in clinical practice.

Keeping to COVID-19 precautions, we are offering online discussions in place of face-to-face visits for now.

Click here to sign up for ACE CUES or find out more.

An established form of evidence-based service

ACE CUES is a form of continuing professional education known as educational visiting (or academic detailing) established in Harvard Medical School almost 40 years ago.1 It involves trained staff visiting healthcare professionals at their workplace, to provide clinical updates based on best available evidence through personalised discussions, for healthcare professionals to apply in their practice. Educational visiting has been demonstrated to improve patient care and outcomes.2-5

Educational visiting services are available in a number of countries, including Australia, the United States, Canada, and Norway. ACE is now introducing educational visiting to Singapore.

Watch the video to find out more about how ACE CUES can support your clinical practice and improve patient outcomes.








Service to support healthcare professionals in patient care

Covering a range of clinical topics over time, ACE CUES is currently offered to GPs registered with private clinics. The service may be extended to other healthcare professionals in the future. The first clinical topic is asthma management, focusing on major recent developments in the approach to treating this chronic respiratory condition.

Click here to sign up for ACE CUES or find out more.

How does ACE CUES work?

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Advantages of ACE CUES
  • Unbiased and credible: based on best available evidence, not tied to any commercial interests.
  • Customised and effective: constructive one-to-one discussions with your specific practice context and potential challenges in mind, making it easier to apply the information.
  • Convenient and efficient: professional education right at your workplace.
  • Useful tools: topic-specific materials with rigorously synthesised content that is practical (e.g. patient education or decision aids), and in keeping with ACE Clinical Guidances (ACGs).

To find out more about ACE CUES, please refer to our FAQs below, or email us at ACE_CUES@moh.gov.sg

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is ACE CUES?

  • ACE CUES stands for Agency for Care Effectiveness Clinical UpdatService.
  • ACE CUES is an educational visiting service, which involves trained staff visiting healthcare professionals at their workplace on a one-to-one basis, to provide clinical updates based on best available evidence through personalised discussions for application in practice. The service is currently available to private general practitioners (GPs), and may be extended to other healthcare professionals in the future.
  • Keeping to COVID-19 precautions, online discussions are offered in place of face-to-face visits for now.

How does ACE CUES work?

  • Covering different clinical topics over time, ACE CUES is offered on a free-subscription basis to GPs registered with private clinics.
  • Subscribing GPs will take part in personalised discussions, scheduled for a time that suits them. Each discussion will take approximately 30 minutes.
  • As part of the discussions, topic-specific tools for GPs to use in practice will be provided, such as those that explain health conditions or treatments to patients.

Who are the staff in ACE CUES visiting healthcare professionals?

  • In line with educational visiting services internationally, staff in ACE CUES are from a variety of healthcare backgrounds.
  • In addition to educational visiting methods, they undergo extensive training, with input from local clinical experts, to achieve in-depth knowledge of the clinical topics.

What are the benefits of educational visiting?

Benefits of educational visiting include:

  • Unbiased and independent: the information provided in educational visiting is based on best available evidence and is not tied to any commercial interests.
  • Interactive and customised: educational visiting is centred on one-to-one constructive discussions, making it easier for healthcare professionals to contextualise and apply the information, as well as to ask questions. With the visiting staff being physically present at the workplace of healthcare professionals, they are better able to appreciate and cater to the practice setting and potential challenges. These elements work together to enable specific needs of individual healthcare professionals to be addressed.
  • Convenient and efficient: with educational visiting, healthcare professionals do not need to leave the workplace to receive professional education. Much relevant information can be covered in a short amount of time, as all points discussed during the one-to-one sessions are tailored to specific needs of individual healthcare professionals.
  • Effective and impactful: educational visiting has been repeatedly demonstrated to improve patient care and outcomes, particularly in terms of medication prescribing.2-5

How do I sign up for ACE CUES?

  • The first clinical topic of ACE CUES is asthma management, focusing on major recent developments in the approach to treating this chronic respiratory condition.
  • GPs can sign up or find out more using the online form here or email the ACE CUES team at ACE_CUES@moh.gov.sg

References:

  1. Avorn J, Soumerai SB. Improving drug-therapy decisions through educational outreach. A randomized controlled trial of academically based “detailing”. N Engl J Med. 1983;308(24):1457–63.
  2. Johnson MJ, May CR. Promoting professional behaviour change in healthcare: what interventions work, and why? A theory-led overview of systematic reviews. BMJ Open 2015;5(9):e008592.
  3. Chhina H, Bhole VM, Goldsmith C, et al. Effectiveness of academic detailing to optimize medication prescribing behaviour of family physicians. J Pharm Sci. 2013;16(4):511-29.
  4. O’Brien MA, Rogers S, Jamtvedt G, et al. Educational outreach visits: effects on professional practice and health care outcomes. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007;(4):CD000409.
  5. Bloom BS. Effects of continuing medical education on improving physician clinical care and patient health: a review of systematic reviews. Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2005;21(3):380-5.